Sustainable Organic Waste Disposal Units

I do not have a compost bin here, and I am reluctant to contribute even my minimal organic waste to the problem of disposal. So I experimented with feeding it to the wildlife.  I thought in my innocence that I may even be able to encourage the local birds to hang around my home.  Though I  have seen one passing peregrine, and one small startlingly coloured bird with an emerald body and a ruby head,  I usually see only the two species of mynah that inhabit this island, and the odd passing swift chasing insects in the evening.  I thought I caught a glimpse of a small bat, one evening, but that isn’t a bird anyway.

Bread and rice leftovers certainly please the mynahs, but I still have my potato and carrot peel, fruit skins, coffee grinds and onion remains to dispose of.  In a little experiment I tried feeding the land crabs. My reasoning, which appears to be sound, is that they must be scavenging fruit and vegetable matter, as they are scarcely predatory.  More likely scavengers and opportunistic omnivores, like pigs.

I appear to have been right.  The scraps vanished, and I did not have to clean up later.  On further experiment I discovered the crabs appear to be partial to chicken bones too. At first I thought young Mikki Tikki Suva, the mongoose who lives under my house, was joining the party, and she may well be contributing, but the crabs are definitely into omnivorous scavenging.  A quick check on the Internet confirmed my deductions.

I now stuff my waste down one of the crab holes and in a very short time it is gone from sight, dragged back into the recesses of the crab larder.

One of the sequels appears to be that the crab holes are getting much larger. I think my little Gecarcinid crustacean  pets are growing bigger, faster.

Which leads me to the next step in sustainable development.  Recycling.  Land crabs are delicious.  I know this from experience in Solomon Islands.  The locals confirm it is so in Fiji too.

So. Now I am farming crabs.  I just have to figure out how to round them up.
Poor photo taken hastily in low light, but my only successful capture so far.

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About Alan

Alone in a sea of spinifex.
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3 Responses to Sustainable Organic Waste Disposal Units

  1. Alan R says:

    No… Do tell!

    Like

  2. dave says:

    And of course, you surely remember the joke about the Man with a tapeworm, and the doctor with the apple..

    Like

  3. dave says:

    It would obviously be a land-crab grab!

    Like

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